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168 items found for ""

  • Feathers/horn/hair/nails | Art Bio Matters

    Feathers/Horn/Hair/Nails Feathers, horn, hair, nails, scales, and hooves, all found in vertebrates, are made from a family of structural proteins called keratins. Back to Materials Composition Conservation Historical Use Case Studies Coming Soon We need you to develop new content for the ABM website. Please email info@artbiomatters.org or message in Slack if you are interested in building the ABM website.

  • Wood | Art Bio Matters

    Wood Wood is produced by the stems and roots of woody plants such as trees and shrubs. Structurally, wood is composed predominantly of cellulose polysacchharid fibers and lignin (a natural polymer chain). Back to Materials Composition Conservation Historical Use Case Studies Coming Soon We need you to develop new content for the ABM website. Please email info@artbiomatters.org or message in Slack if you are interested in building the ABM website.

  • Matthew Teasdale

    Matthew Teasdale Research Associate McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research Department of Archaeology University of Cambridge Previous Next Cambridge, UK MEMBER INFORMATION Team Presenter 2021, Steering Committee 2018 Hiding in plain sight: The biomolecular identification of seal use in Romanesque medieval manuscripts Matthew graduated with a BSc in human genetics (2007) and an MRes in bioinformatics (2008) from Newcastle University. He then moved to Trinity College Dublin to complete a PhD in genetics (2013) as part of the Marie Skłodowska-Curie initial training network LeCHE, specialising in the analysis of ancient DNA. He then conducted further postdoctoral research in archaeogenetics at Trinity College Dublin as part of the ERC funded CodeX project. He then completed a 2-year Marie Skłodowska-Curie research fellowship at the university of York. In 2019 Matthew joined the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research as a research associate as part of the Beasts to Craft project. Read Abstract All members

  • Laurie Waters

    Laurie Waters Retired Los Alamos National Laboratory in April 2012 Currently doing contract work Previous Next ​ MEMBER INFORMATION Poster Presenter 2021 Minimally invasive analysis: Fact or fantasy? The challenge of 14C dating Early Modern material Laurie Waters is a Nuclear Physicist by training, having received her PhD at the State University of New York in 1990. For 21 years she worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory, doing experimental physics, and extensive simulations of radiation transport. Much experimental work was done at the LANSCE 800 MeV proton accelerator, and she also headed the team that formed the newest division in the American Nuclear Society; the Accelerator Applications Division. All this work has given her much experience in techniques such as AMS and various radiation interrogation measurements. Read Abstract All members

  • Tom Sakmar

    Tom Sakmar Richard M. & Isabel P. Furlaud Professor The Rockefeller University Previous Next New York, NY, USA MEMBER INFORMATION Steering Committee 2018 ​ Dr. Tom Sakmar is a physician-scientist and molecular biologist who studies how drugs affect the function of cell surface receptors called GPCRs. He has developed a toolbox of drug-discovery technologies that are now being applied to search for genetic material in art and cultural objects. All members

  • Anthony Caragiulo

    Anthony Caragiulo Assistant Director of Genomic Operations Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics American Museum of Natural History Previous Next New York, NY, USA MEMBER INFORMATION Participant 2021 ​ I'm the Assistant Director of the Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. My research focuses on population and conservation genetics to understand drivers of diversification, large-scale movements, and genetic adaptation primarily in carnivores and other large mammals. A major research interest of mine is using museum specimens in my research and applying genetic methods to identify the biological origins of museum specimens and artifacts. All members

  • Varnishes/Coatings | Art Bio Matters

    Varnishes/Coatings A wide variety of varnishes and coatings exist, generally with the purpose as acting as a protective coating or adding a specific sheen to an object. Back to Materials Composition Conservation Historical Use Case Studies Coming Soon We need you to develop new content for the ABM website. Please email info@artbiomatters.org or message in Slack if you are interested in building the ABM website.

  • Anna Serotta

    Anna Serotta Associate Conservator Metropolitan Museum of Art Previous Next New York, NY, USA MEMBER INFORMATION Participant 2021 ​ Anna Serotta is an objects conservator at The Metropolitan Museum of Art where she is primarily responsible for the conservation of the Egyptian Art collection. Her research interests span a broad range of topics, including stone carving technology, technical imaging and the ethical care of human remains. Anna has worked as an archaeological field conservator on sites in Turkey, Greece, Italy and Egypt, including at The Met’s excavation at Dahshur. She is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome as well as a guest lecturer at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. All members

  • Patricia Marroquin Norby

    Patricia Marroquin Norby Associate Curator of Native American Art The American Wing The Metropolitan Museum of Art Previous Next New York, NY, USA MEMBER INFORMATION Invited Speaker 2021 ​ Patricia Marroquin Norby (Purépecha) oversees the American Wing’s Native American art collection. An award-winning scholar and museum leader, she previously served as Senior Executive and Assistant Director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian-New York and as Director of the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies at the Newberry in Chicago. Her forthcoming book, Water, Bones, and Bombs examines 20th-century American Indian art and environmental disputes in northern New Mexico. She co-edited “Aesthetic Violence: Art and Indigenous Ways of Knowing,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal (2015). She earned her PhD at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. All members

  • Laura Cartechini

    Laura Cartechini Research Scientist Institute of Molecular Science and Technologies (ISTM) – National Research Council (CNR) Previous Next Milan, Padova, Perugia, ITALY MEMBER INFORMATION Speaker, 2018 Immunodetection of proteins in paint media by ELISA and IFM Laura Cartechini received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Perugia in 1998. Her research activity is aimed at understanding the chemical and physical properties of art historical materials and relative degradation processes for diagnostic and conservation purposes. Read Abstract All members